Make Your Clothes Smell Like the Woods You Hunt

|   Category: Bowhunting, Scent Control Written by:

For centuries man has attempted to compete against a deer’s sense of smell. We have come a long way from wood smoke and mud, but the challenge remains the same. With the nose of a whitetail having up to 297-million olfactory receptors, the quest to fool a deer’s sense of smell often seems futile.
 

 
There have been dozens of articles written about the importance of hunting the wind and that factor will always remain paramount. Cleanliness and hygiene are also a vital part of pursuing whitetails. However, there are a host of things that will help you gain an advantage over the wily whitetail and this might be one tip to add to your list.
 
While storing hunting clothes in a scent proof tote add a bag of leaves, dirt and forest floor for a natural cover scent.
 

 
My personal preference is to use only natural cover scents while hunting. Using the Rubbermaid® Action Packer for storing hunting clothes, I like to add a bag of forest floor from the exact place I am hunting. While not leaving an overwhelming odor, the leaves, dirt, acorns or cornstalks do add a light natural smell to your hunting clothes.
 
Your local Wal-Mart should carry a Tide® High Performance Wash Bag with Optimesh Technology that works perfect for this application. This wash bag is made of ultra-fine mesh which keeps leaves, dirt, acorns, etc. in the bag, yet it allows the aroma to filter out. The Tide High Performance bag is also zippered, this allows easy access for removing or freshening up your scent.
 
This is just one small step in trying to gain an advantage over Mr. Talltines. We would love to hear some of your tips and techniques for scent control.
 

About the author

Christ follower, husband, father and founder of 365 Whitetail. Randy is the former Online Editorial Director for Petersen's Bowhunting, Petersen's Hunting, North American Whitetailand Bowhunter Magazine. His passions include fly fishing, photography and exploring wild places.

View all articles by Randy Hynes